The Corner Office

I am not big on books or articles that espouse numerical requirements to be or succeed at something.   The 7 habits,5Rules, etc.  They often suggest inadequacy, and especially as of late it is a tool to suggest “we” belong to a club you are not qualified for.   In reading this adaptation from The Corner Office: Indispensable and Unexpected Lessons From CEOs on How to Lead and Succeed,” The author, NY Time columnist Adam Bryant seems to take a somewhat different tact by stating “The good news: these traits are not genetic. It’s not as if you have to be tall or left-handed. These qualities are developed through attitude, habit and discipline — factors that are within your control.”

Based on interviews with over 70 CEO’s the book proposes five essentials for success, based on the CEO’s interviewed and what they look for when hiring.

Passionate Curiosity
They ask big-picture questions. They wonder why things work the way they do and whether those things can be improved upon. They want to know people’s stories, and what they do.

The C.E.O.’s are not necessarily the smartest people in the room, but they are the best students
You want somebody who is just alert and very awake and engaged with the world and wanting to know more.”
Do they tend to blame failures on factors they cannot control, or do they believe they have the ability to shape events and circumstances by making the most of what they can control.

Team Smarts
They understand how teams work and how to get the most out of the group.

The people who truly succeed in business are the ones who actually have figured out how to mobilize people who are not their direct reports.”

A Simple Mind-Set
Yet few people can deliver the simplicity that many bosses want. Instead, they mistakenly assume that the bosses will be impressed by a long PowerPoint presentation….

Even Steve Ballmer CEO of Microsoft, the owners of PowerpPoint says “he understood the impulse in presentations to share all the underlying research that led to a conclusion. But he changed the way he runs meetings to get to the conclusion first.”

Battle-Hardened Confidence
They want to know if somebody is the kind of person who takes ownership of challenges or starts looking for excuses.

As they moved up in organizations, the attitude remained the same — this is my job, and I’m going to own it.

Fearlessness

Are you comfortable being uncomfortable?

Many executives said fearlessness was one of the top qualities they’re looking for when they were interviewing job candidates.
Chief executives advise that you will be rewarded for fearlessness, because so few people live that way and bring this attitude to work.

About allan

Allan Fried is a New York City based Life & Career Coach specializing in working with people who want meaning in their careers. Having been an executive at a major entertainment company, COO at an early state digital media company, and owned his own business, he has powerful insights on what it takes to find and excel at work you love. He has been described by his clients as talented, Zen-like, insightful, and passionate. His client’s success can be attributed to his intuitive talent in guiding clients to uncover and reveal what is truly important to them. Allan has over 20 years experience as an executive and entrepreneur in the entertainment industry. He spent the bulk of his career at BMG as Vice-President International, where he worked on developing the careers of recording artists. In these positions he learned a lot about using one’s unique talents and gifts to pursue success. He has also been heavily involved in his community through involvement with Make-A-Wish Foundation, Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, Empire State Pride Agenda, Habitat for Humanity, and several other community initiatives

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